California Computer Products | i |
 
name: California Computer Products
Description

CalComp Technology, Inc., Anaheim, CA, USA, known as CalComp, founded in 1959, produced plotters, digitizers, and other graphic input and output devices. In 1968, CalComp organized an international competition for computer and plotter art. The firm published and distributed works by Doyle Cavin, Ace Hudson, Dee Hudson, Larry Jenkins, Jane Moon, and Kerry Strand. It was bought by Lockheed in the 1980s and closed production in 1999.

Exhib.: 1968, Cybernetic Serendipity, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London. 1969, Tendencies 4.

Source: CalComp

Comments
anonymous
posted almost 3 years ago
Hello, I have one of these prints and was wondering if they sought after or Rare?. I just bought one ( the snail) from the salvation Army. Very cool History here thanks for sharing. Best Regards, Eric
anonymous
posted over 2 years ago
We are looking for early work. Contact: office@dam.org
anonymous
posted over 1 year ago
My father worked at calcomp in the 60's and I have three of these originals. Are they worth anything?
anonymous
posted 3 months ago
very FEW originals and none signed were permitted by CALCOMP so we quit making then. I was the supervisor of the demo room equipment and a few programmers. Kerry Strand was in my group. I had 250 high quality unsigned lithographs of the Snail, the Fisherman, and the Wheat made and sold them to raise tuition money for 2 brothers and most of those were sold in Hawaii where brother Hugh Jenkins taught chemistry at Punahough High School and is now known for his "Big Island Glass" glass shop. If you paid more than $5, thank you!!! The Snail was a 4-1/2 hour single pen down stroke with perfect ink flow. Symbol Graphics (SGI) is my company but Calcomp tried to compete with Cas-Mate engineering software and failed. I wrote Letter-Art in 1982 and was the FIRST to offer DOS and FORTRAN sign making software with Ioline plotters that required a child's wood burning hot tip to melt (cut) vinyl. I offered the software to CalComp because the engineers had a knife cutting carriage but did not make a production copy and then failed as a corporation. SGI lives on after 35 years of customers. Larry Jenkins
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